Reflections - Article Abstracts

Salam Bhimrao! Dr. Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar & The Dalit Movement in India, Goldy George
Posted October 9, 2006

Mr George is a human rights activist dedicated to working with Dalit issues in India. This article focuses on the rise of Dr Ambedkar, the founder of the Dalit movement. Dr Ambedkar was a prominent voice for Dalit equality in the first half of the twentieth century, advocating change through peacful measures. His philosphies continue to provide an important foundation in the ongoing struggle for rights and equality as part of the Dalit movement.

[On-line Article]

Khmer Rouge Tribunals, A Cambodian student
Posted July 17, 2006

A recent university graduate in Cambodia expresses his concerns about the Khmer Rouge tribunals and how they might be carried out. This article responds to the highly debated tribunals that are about to begin.

[On-line Article]

Stories of Others, Ngamsuk Ruttanasatian
Posted November 26, 2004

Ms Ngamsuk looks at the kind of conflict that exists at the community level in Burma - what the ethnic people in Burma face and how they deal with the conflict in their communities. Specifically, she looks at the refugee communities of Karen people from Tenasserim Division of Burma. These people had to abandon their landing Burma because of military operations and the activities of transnational corporations.

[Full PDF Version]

The Dalit World of Injustice and Peacelessness, Goldy M. George
Posted August, 2004

All of us live in a world of guns and bombs, wars and battles, hunger and starvation, deaths and killings, and what not. Justice and Peace is something unpredictable and unreachable, and in many cases it has disappeared from the lexicon itself. Today what we find is a market of all sorts of deals, even peace.

As a community we are in crisis the crisis of life; the crisis of disharmony; the crisis of livelihood; the crisis of sustainability and so on. The state is helpless. As this crisis is further intensifying in this paper I will deal with the current status of the crisis in India, and how communities like Dalits and Adivasis are adversely affected and to what extends. In the next paper I would deal with hope and the power of sustenance.

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From June 4 to Article 23, Rose Wu (Director of Hong Kong Christian Institute)
Posted June 3, 2003

From the tragic sacrifice of the deaths of June 4, the people of Hong Kong must learn a lesson from the courage of the students and workers in Tiananmen and stand up and say No to the proposed national security legislation while they still can.

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Justice in a Threatened World, Max Ediger
Posted February 21, 2003

Our world is a deeply threatened one. The violence of war, terrorism and economic disparity affects the lives and security of everyone. Peace built on justice, or just-peace, seems like a goal too distant to be achievable. But there is hope because this threatened world can be transformed. In 2 Corinthians 5:17 Paul says that when we put on Christ, we become a new person (transformation). The "putting on" of Christ transforms us, and through that transformation we become agents of transformation in the world. We begin acting together for just-peace, and therein lies hope. To participate in this work of transformation, we need first look briefly at some of the stark realities facing us today.

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Why are We Poor?, Dr Farrukh Saleem
Posted January 20, 2003

In his article "Why are we poor?" Dr Farrukh Saleem links the terrible poverty in India and Pakistan with the constant push to upgrade and enlarge the military systems of the two countries. His reflections point out that injustice in our world is too often caused by a focus on military might as a way of ensuring security and peace.

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Seeking the Roots of Conflict, Max Ediger
Posted January 14, 2003

There are a few possible roots of the growing violence facing our world today, and there are some things we can do to confront this violence and began to transform it. The sources for the information contained in this article are available from the author at justpeace@daga.org.hk.

[Full PDF Version]

Peace in Northeast Asia, Prof. Yong-Bock Kim (Chancellor, Advanced Institute for the Study of Life, Asia Pacific Graduate School for the Study of Life)
Posted January 2, 2003

Today the struggle for peace has a new special meaning for all the living beings on earth. It is a common belief that peace is a fundamental condition for community of life, human and natural and that the true peace for life is based upon justice. However, the times have changed radically from the previous age.

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Peace Requires Hard Work, AHRC
Posted January 2, 2003

Annual Christmas statement from our friends at Asia Human Rights Center (AHRC).

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From Cold War to Hot Peace, Akum Longchari and Babu Ayindo
Posted December 20, 2002

Authors Akum Longchari (Nagalim) and Babu Ayindo (Kenya) discuss whether many of the present conflict management process are simply moving us from the cold war era into a time of "hot peace," or a time of peace in which the history and culture of the conflicts are ignored in order to reach a "quick fix" to the problems. If this is truly the case, then the "peace" achieved will not be long lasting.

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Navajo Justice, The Honorable Robert Yazzie (Chief Justice of the Navajo Nation)
Posted December 20, 2002

The Honorable Robert Yazzie, Chief Justice of the Navajo Nation USA, explains how the Navajo concept of justice affects the process of managing conflicts. The emphasis is not on laws and punishment, but rather on finding a harmonious way of resolving the issue so that relationships are restored and there is peace within the community.

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A Child Soldier, Burma Issues
Posted December 20, 2002

This true story, shared by Burma Issues, illustrates how and why children are often drawn into armed conflicts. In areas of serious oppression and hopelessness, a normal childhood becomes impossible and children quickly take on the responsibilities of adults.

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Bridging Conflict Prevention and Human Rights, Mark Tamthai
Posted December 20, 2002

Professor Tamthai of Thailand, reflecting on his experiences in peacemaking, says, "I guess the most basic assumption underlying my work is the belief that underneath all the layers of cultural and historical realities of the world's different communities there really is such a thing as 'our common humanity'. My work in the past (and what I see as the mandate of my work in the future) has been to approach the various social conflicts that exist in Thailand by understanding thoroughly the outer layers, peel them away to expose this deep and in many cases hidden common foundation, and then use a combination of all of these parts to participate in creating a just and peaceful reconciliation."

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A Role for International Organizations, Andy Carl
Posted December 20, 2002

Andy Carl concludes in this article that, "If not a new field, INGO involvement in conflict resolution is certainly in a state of rapid expansion and on a steep learning curve. This article has sought to raise a few key issues for agencies working in this field. How this growing field will itself be monitored remains, as yet, an open question. The essential questions are: have we got our approach to conflict analysis right? Are we asking the right questions? In the face of wars and complex emergencies there can be no doubt about the urgency to support and invest in agents for constructive social change: the independent media, human rights monitors and advocates, and community-based peacemakers and processes. Of course, this is not an argument for blank chequebook diplomacy. It is essential that as we come to understand more clearly the economic dimensions of so many of today's violent conflicts, that we are more transparent about the marketplace for peacemaking activities."

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Miracles of Grace, Akum Longchari
Posted December 20, 2002

Akum Longchari of Nagalim reflects on the process and importance of reconciliation to conflict transformation. He concludes, "I believe that there is no future without reconciliation! Reconciliation is a must for the future, if there is to be one. The journey to reconciliation is not an easy one. Reconciliation cannot take place when violations of human rights and oppression and injustice still continue to exist. Reconciliation can only take place once the decision making power is restored to the people and there is cessation of violation of rights and oppression; and social, political and economic justice has been restored to the people. The journey to reconciliation cannot take place in a vacuum. Therefore reconciliation is often seen as a process of rebuilding a society in a post-conflict situation. As a result reconciliation has not been given its due place and respect in world politics. We must realize that peace processes and reconciliation cannot be separated - they are in essence part of the same body. Reconciliation cannot take place when there is the 'foot on the neck.'

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